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Zimmerman's Research Guide


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Federal Sentencing Guidelines

The Federal Sentencing Guidelines (a/k/a "Sentencing Guidelines for the United States Courts") are published as part of Title 18 of the United States Code (see "United States Code."). The Guidelines are also published in the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual.

In addition, the current Guidelines are searchable on Lexis (GENFED;GLINE) and Westlaw (FCJ-FSG). You can pull sections from Lexis using the format: "ussg x" .

More information about the Guidelines is posted by the United States Sentencing Commission.

Case Law: Case law annotations are published after each section of the Guidelines in the United State Code Annotated and the United States Code Service, as well as in West's Federal Sentencing Guidelines Digest. For full-text searching, Lexis offers a database of cases interpreting the Federal Sentencing Guidelines (CRIME;FEDSEN).

Historical Editions: The U.S. Sentencing Commission posts free historical editions of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual back to 1987. Westlaw has historical editions of the Manual back to 1997 (FCJ-FSG-OLD). You can get annotated historical editions in outdated volumes of the United States Code Annotated and the United States Code Service and the related databases on Lexis and Westlaw (see "United States Code").

Organizational Guidelines: The Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations (FSG0) are codified as Chapter 8 of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual. More information is available on U.S. Sentencing Commission's the Organizational Guidelines page.

Proposed As: The U.S. Sentencing Commission posts Proposed Amendments.

Pardons: For information on Presidential Pardons, see "Criminal Law."

Treatises: For a discussion of the Guidelines check out Federal Sentencing Law and Practice (West) and/or the Federal Sentencing Reporter, both of which are on Westlaw (FSLP and FCJ-FSR, respectively).


See Also
Crime Statistics
Criminal Law
Prisons, Prisoners and Jails
United States Code
United States Sentencing Commission

For comments, questions and suggestions, email the author
Copyright 2014 Andrew Zimmerman